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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> pporalso comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it looked like a scene from a movie, but it was all too real. a meteor came crashing down to earth today, triggered a fireball over russia, and sent people running for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> rorter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show
for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it looked like a scene from a movie, but it was all too real. a meteor came crashing down to earth today, triggered a fireball over russia, and sent people running for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> reporter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show until it suddenly explodes 30 miles above the earth. the city of chelyabinsk was unlucky to be beneath the meteorites flight path and was showered with debris dropping from the sky. thousands of windows were smashed, shocked workers evacuated their offices. this school class is about to be interrupted by the shock wave. here the windows come crashing in, and a national judo squad runs for cover. c
that is the kind of republican you have on pbs. >> you cannot say that about paul gigot, the editorial page of "the wall street journal." paul dated from 1993 until 2001. the only reason he left was that he left for new york to run the page. he got the promotion. >> which one of those three did you like the best? >> since then i have been doing it with david brooks -- all three of them have been terrific. i have been very orchard. >> what is the difference in those three conservatives or three whatever they are? >> what is the difference? i do not know. i did it with david brooks longer. coming up on 12 years. to watch david grow from this young firebrand to the walt whitman of his generation -- that has been a fun thing. >> so the greatest journalist in your lifetime -- or that you have ever read or known besides yourself? >> mary mcgrory, the way she wrote, the fact that mary mcgrory was a columnist for "the washington post" -- before that , "the washington star to go a couple things -- she went to the events. she did not just to the thumbsucking, i had lunch with the secretary of state a
, and welcome to this "pbs newshour" special coverage of president obama's "state of the union" address. we want you to know this program is also being livestreamed on our home page on the web. in just a few moments, the president will spell out his policy agenda for the start of his second term. he is expected tonight to focus mainly on jobs and the economy, and to highlight other domestic priorities including gun control and immigration reform, but also to touch on international challenges. here with me, as they will be throughout our coverage tonight, are syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. mark, what is different about a state of the union when it's the first one of a second term? >> you don't have that many more to look forward to? the sand is running out of the glass. this is probably the best shot that most presidents have in their second term is that first year-and-a-half before you get into congressional elections and the lame duckness really sets in. the race to succeed him begins while he's just sitting there. so this is important. this is th
public service announcements featuring big bird set to run on several pbs stations next week. >> no matter what your age, it's important to get your body moving every single day to help keep you healthy. >> look, mrs. obama, i'm getting moving right now by jogging. >> joining me now for more on this, is leah goldman with "marie claire" magazine. >> we've seen the first lady enlist rachael ray to dr. oz and how would you rate the success of it? >> it's been a successful platform for the first lady, impressively so, i would say. she's seen some really significant results, actually, and typically you see first lady adopt these platforms and they go on the road with them and they do appearances for them, and we've actually seen some effects of this tour. for example, she's going out to mississippi, and since she started this let's move campaign, mississippi has seen a 13% drop of childhood obesity rate and that is the heaviest state in the nation so that's pretty impressive. >> let's look at poll numbers on the first lady. a poll taken two months ago shows that 73% of americans a
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)